fk vs kt:  Early Version

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“The political landscape is the body, the body is Brexit…

 

Like Kay’s previous work, the artist’s own body is a metaphor for the provocation of social issues, this time exploring themes of patriotism, division and personal conflict.

Political performance is at its strongest when it is able to relate itself to the emotional feelings of an individual and this is precisely what Kay does, discussing the emotional pull between two characters…and the pain which can be caused by one polarising decision. This visual work focuses on the artists own body, incorporating  projections, body art, movement and drag performance, plus two of the artist’s major strengths: durational repetition and physical pain.

Unusually for Kay, the theme of discomfort with personal circumstance sees the artist employ spoken word in the performance where previously her silence has been a cornerstone to her performances. The verbal section is one of the highlights of FK v KT.

FK v KT offers audiences an experience of close-up intensity rarely seen in relation to political subjects. The subtle sexualisation of Brexit is enthralling, as are the wider issues discussed in the work.”

Written by Gary Cook

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"Sorry"

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“Frances Kay, from Rishton near Blackburn, brings her controversial performance Sorry to Lancashire Fringe Festival on Friday, July 15…And this is one not to be missed. It’s unlike anything else on at the festival – and unlike anything else you will ever see. Ever…But it’s the way this message is delivered, by a hugely innovative performance artist, which is most striking. Kay’s work pushes boundaries, not just for the artist herself but also for the audience.”

 

Written by Gary Cook: (Full Review)

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Scaffold

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“The building is not under reconstruction. It is the performance space for Frances Kay. She moves through and around the scaffolding for hours… She moves through the space, almost hypnotically slowly…The illusion is of calm and grace, the reality of course is Frances Kay is actually heaving and straining as she moves from position to position, up, down and around the three dimensional space. Her limbs are exposed so you can see the effort. You can also see the history of the performance on her skin, minor marks and scratches… It was beautiful, and I can imagine it as a film.”

Written by John J Lynch: (Full Review) 

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